Patron of Writing: Looking forwards. Looking back.

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Photo by Rakicevic Nenad from Pexels

I have the best job in the world.

I spent three weeks in November feeling right at home at DGS – huge thanks to the English team, who made me feel so welcome, and a special INCREDIBLY BIG thank you to the Year 9 students (all 270 of them), who opened their eyes, ears, hearts and minds to my poetry workshops. The work they produced in under one hour was stupendous! They made getting out of bed on a grotty winter’s morning entirely worth it.

Another shining facet of my work this term in school has been working with the two Poet Laureates: Nina Winstone (Year 8) and Kat Richards (Year 11). Behind the scenes, these two poets have been writing away, fulfilling their role by writing in response to commissions. It’s been delightful to guide and support them on their journeys so far. They’re performing their latest poems in the end of term school assemblies but of course you can also follow their writing journeys and read their finished pieces on this blog.

Aside from my work with DGS, my own writing continues at its own unpredictable rate behind the scenes. I’m currently working on my second poetry collection, a new narrative sequence, and absolutely love diving in and out, as the drafting process continues. I have also enjoyed giving poetry readings in some inspiring places over the last few months – I think Oxford’s Natural History Museum gets the prize for most atmospheric venue!

I hope the New Year brings you optimism, creativity and contentment. I’m launching a poetry evening course for adults in the New Year, so am very excited about that. 2019 also brings me a fresh group of avid Year 9 & 10 writers on my Young Writers’ Mentoring Programme at DGS. Having already met them, I can’t wait to start working with them all.

Have a wonderful Christmas, and don’t forget you can keep track of my latest events, progress and general reflections on poetry and life, if you so wish, on Twitter @kitespotter.

Ask a Creative

ask-blackboard-356079I’ve reached the end of my poetry writing workshops with Year 9 students at Didcot Girls’ School. It looked a bit like this:

3 weeks

270 teenagers

a storm of unique voices

dozens of mind-freeing doodles

a symphonic display of ideas & imagery

hundreds of doors opened

AND

a flurry of post-it note questions posed.

One aim of these sessions has been to give young writers an insight into being a professional poet/writer/artist (a career they might have dismissed as not having ‘career status’.) So I encouraged them all to ASK QUESTIONS!

Here are some of the many and varied things that they were curious to find out about:

QUESTIONS

  • Why do you write poetry?
  • How many poems have you written?
  • What’s your new book called?
  • Are you a famous poet?
  • Did you go to school at DGS when you were younger?
  • Is the subject of your new book real or imagined?
  • Do you get paid as an author?
  • Is being a writer fun – would you recommend it?
  • What’s your favourite part about writing poems?
  • How much do you earn?
  • What inspired you to become a writer?
  • Why did you decide to become a poet?
  • Do you find it easy to title your poems?
  • Do you have a main topic that you write about a lot?
  • What’s your favourite genre of poetry?
  • What’s your favourite poem (that you haven’t written)?
  • Would you give up poetry if you could get another dream job?

 

It’s been a privilege DGS – THANK YOU! And as I continue the year as your Patron of Writing (with more creative opportunities to come), let’s keep this dialogue going…

“So, let’s start with your name. And why you are here.” #LetsDoThisKids – 3

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(When learning something new, you have to start somewhere.)

No. This is not an AA meeting. This was how we kicked off the Writers’ Mentoring Programme at Didcot Girls’ School this week – an initiative that has grown out of the poetry workshops I led last term with around 250 year 9 and 10 students.

As it’s a New Year (and all that) please indulge me in a brief glance back at the sessions that happened at the end of last year. I managed to get a snapshot of the student responses and they were downright FAB-U-LOUS:

Over 95% of the students enjoyed the workshop and said that, in that one hour, they had learned something new – about poetry, about writing, about themselves, the list went on …

It’s worth remembering that these students were not ‘hand-picked’, they were not screened or selected by ability, they did not even choose to opt-in to the workshop.

So yes, I was both staggered and delighted by their feedback. Of course, it’s also a reminder that ALL young people can access poetry and creativity and (even more importantly?) that MOST of them can enjoy the experience!

Mentoring Week 1: The writer’s notebook

The workshops were an important gateway to my Writers’ Mentoring Programme and I was genuinely excited to meet the Young Writers this week. They are adventurous, inquisitive and enthusiastic – and not just about the Jaffa Cakes! It was an absolute pleasure to sit with them and start this journey, and we began (after the essential getting-to-know-you silly stuff) by discussing the source of our ideas as writers: how we find and retain these little gems. We shared the variety of tools that we use to help us record, store and organise raw material, and came up with a useful spidergram of shared ideas (It wouldn’t be a session of mine without a spidergram):

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I threw out some of my old notebooks for them to flick through. Some of the complete nonsense recorded in these brought a few giggles, however, these compact, dog-eared notebooks also made the valuable point that, as writers, we need to switch our FILTER to ‘OFF’ initially.

Just note it down. Keep it for later.

I think this is something that is almost counter-intuitive to a lot of students. They are so indoctrinated into having every word/sentence/paragraph scrutinised, that they are in danger of losing the ability to write freely and just for themselves. This is one barrier that I’m aiming to help them break through during the mentoring process.

Each week we’ll have a focus as well as a ‘writer’s development task’ to work on at home, so please do keep an eye on this blog, where I’ll be sharing these – in case you want to try it with your own students/young writers.

Writer’s Development Task 1:

Get a notebook. Write something every day. Bring it next week!