I’m a writer. Do I feel inspired?

abstract-art-berlin-6739

We’re now on week 3 of our Young Writers’ Mentoring programme 2018/19,

which I run as part of my Patron of Writing role at Didcot Girls’ School, so it’s high time I posted an update, methinks!

I guess what impressed me most at first about my new cohort of 23 year 9 and 10 students, was their openness to inspiration as writers. 

I think it’s true to say that ALL writers (poets, novelists, bloggers, life writers etc) have periods of writer’s block, when the ideas go quiet and all moments of inspiration dry up. In that situation, it’s hard not to wobble and question yourself (‘I know I wrote that great thing ONCE, but what if I’m a one-trick pony? A fake?) Out of necessity, to combat these periods, we have to develop strategies for managing these crises. Prevention is generally better than cure; for this reason I start at the beginning with my mentees, challenging them on where and how they find their ideas, as well as how, where and why they ‘store’ them.

The refreshing news is that, during our week 1 discussion on this, the group contributed a wide range of places/events/stimuli where they find inspiration, as well as a broad spectrum of methods/technology they use for storing and retaining these ideas (as and when they encounter them!) Here are a handful of their ideas, as captured in my messy whiteboard notation, around the central question: ‘where do we get our ideas?’

img_3767

img_3769

My particular favourites here are: memes; ideologies and role play! It was also really refreshing that ‘stuff you read’ came up; this sparked another conversation later about how necessary and significant it is for writers to read.

The discussion proved to me that young writers are more alert and open to stimuli than more mature writers. As ‘adult’ writers, somehow we have to work harder at finding and retaining fresh ideas and material. I have to admit I’m a bit jealous.

Ultimately, it’s amazing to have these discussions, and I know that increasing their awareness of their own creative process will enhance their range and productivity even further. Which is pretty exciting.

 

Ask a Creative

ask-blackboard-356079I’ve reached the end of my poetry writing workshops with Year 9 students at Didcot Girls’ School. It looked a bit like this:

3 weeks

270 teenagers

a storm of unique voices

dozens of mind-freeing doodles

a symphonic display of ideas & imagery

hundreds of doors opened

AND

a flurry of post-it note questions posed.

One aim of these sessions has been to give young writers an insight into being a professional poet/writer/artist (a career they might have dismissed as not having ‘career status’.) So I encouraged them all to ASK QUESTIONS!

Here are some of the many and varied things that they were curious to find out about:

QUESTIONS

  • Why do you write poetry?
  • How many poems have you written?
  • What’s your new book called?
  • Are you a famous poet?
  • Did you go to school at DGS when you were younger?
  • Is the subject of your new book real or imagined?
  • Do you get paid as an author?
  • Is being a writer fun – would you recommend it?
  • What’s your favourite part about writing poems?
  • How much do you earn?
  • What inspired you to become a writer?
  • Why did you decide to become a poet?
  • Do you find it easy to title your poems?
  • Do you have a main topic that you write about a lot?
  • What’s your favourite genre of poetry?
  • What’s your favourite poem (that you haven’t written)?
  • Would you give up poetry if you could get another dream job?

 

It’s been a privilege DGS – THANK YOU! And as I continue the year as your Patron of Writing (with more creative opportunities to come), let’s keep this dialogue going…

#LetsDoThisKids 6 – To Be A Mentor

This week, I did some catching up with The (always brilliant) Verb (BBC R3) and came across their ‘How do you choose a mentor?’ discussion (Dec 1, 2017, with the inimitable poet Hollie McNish, listen to it here). It got me thinking. And realising that I am deeply glad to be a mentor to my young writers on our Mentoring programme at Didcot Girls’ School.

pexels-photo-695904
Everyone needs a little helpful direction sometimes.

Every week this process presents me with challenges:

What can I offer them? How will I share it? How will it impact them?

And I guess this week, having reached half term and a short hiatus, was a time to reflect. So.

What’s changed in the last 5 weeks?

  • These writers are continually demonstrating sharper observation.
  • They are increasingly aware of their power as wordsmiths. Power to reflect their world. Power to make a mark on their world. Power to present realities in a fresh way. Power to challenge things.
  • They are speaking out. A few read their own work in front of the entire group this week. That’s a FIRST. But I know it won’t be a LAST.
  • They are probably taking away with them more than I can imagine, as I continue to share openly with them about my thinking about writing: my process, my source of ideas, my treasured and collected fragments garnered from other writers.

And in other news …

Some of the writers are working towards competition deadlines with their work (DEADlines: always a good push to finish things 😊), receiving one-to-one feedback from me as they go.

Most are currently editing a ‘Voice’ piece, and putting into practice new editing skills and insights

Many may be thinking about the quote I shared this week, that writing is in fact ‘80% reading’ (as according to Patience Agbabi) … and picking up a book …

and

Most are getting excited about our plans to publish our own ANTHOLOGY at the end of our 20 week journey (more on this soon!)

BRING IT ON.

 

Writer’s Development Task 5:

Continue to observe ‘your person’ and add observations to your notebook.

Over half term, edit your Voice piece. Use the question prompts.

CUT. ADD, using your notebook ideas. EXPERIMENT. Work on the TITLE.

#LetsDoThisKids – 2 (Or: what I’d like to show you after one week of student workshops)

So, what does happen when we give young people a few simple writing tools and FREEDOM ?

I’m excited to be able to share snippets of work that some brilliant 13 and 14 year old writers at Didcot Girls’ School have created this week. (And I should add that these are drafts produced in a very limited space of time. I am entirely unashamed of their crossings out and spelling mistakes.)

IMG_1538IMG_1536IMG_1535IMG_1537

 

The quality and originality of their writing wasn’t the only thing that blew me away!

Just take a look at some of their brief reflections on the workshop process:

IMG_1533IMG_1531IMG_1528IMG_1527

So this evidence all begs the question: What do we need to do to provide an environment that enables young people’s creativity to flourish?

I think that the most important element is summed up by one student here –

‘I loved how much freedom we were given.’

Reassure these young writers that there are no ‘rules’; that there are no right or wrong answers; that there is no pressure to offer up what they write; that this writing is first and foremost PLAY and EXPERIMENTATION.

Then sit back and wait…

IMG_1529